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Drink Review: Pigs Nose Pure Malty Flavours

Described in Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible 2006 as “A big, sweet, chunky, gawky, grainlashed but hugely enjoyable blend.”

Pigs Nose is an exceptionally fine five year old blended whisky, created by Richard Patterson, Scotland’s only third generation master blender as a companion for Sheep Dip – for week days but not for the Christmas Cake.

The blend contains a high percentage (40%) of malt whiskies, principally from Speyside imbuing the product with their characteristic softness; the name comes from the farming expression “soft as a pig’s nose.”

Pigs Nose Pure Malty Flavours Review:

On first opening the glass, an enticing aroma is released. Initial impressions are of wood, fresh, clean and smoky as well as oily and moderately spicy. Cool, clear with a sunburst colour although not deep gold; it flows with verve into the glass then gently across the tongue.

I have always loved the product’s unusually lengthy and satisfying finish with a slow unveiling of wood, warm, sweet, dry and savoury. The taste is both mellow with a long, warming and spicy finish.

In a glass of chilled water it has only increased in intensity and is now rather thicker and sweeter, with the creation of new fruits (apples and pears) – more rounded and satisfying than any other blend I have tried. A warmness is also now evident, which gives a dry spiciness.

This is a cleverly designed light blend which is unashamedly malty in character, blending its different whiskies together seamlessly and in a way that resembles a soft gentle hand stroked against the palm of the mouth, then the tongue and eventually the lips – a long lingering finish.

ff top, a café with outside overlooking a sea view with sails in blue, a small red ferret, a black car and a striped door. Coffee and cake.

Pigs Nose Pure Malty Flavours Review:

Base notes of wood, salt, spiciness and smoke.

This is an easy drinking, relaxed, friendly and comforting whisky.

Aging

Aged in: Europe

Colour:

Pure clear spirit.

Low dosage

A spring and a shower with very little rain.

A meadow with a blue sky and white clouds.

 

Nose:

Fresh, clear, grainy and smoky.

 

Taste:

A creamy pure flavour, slightly sweet plus a dash of spice.

a swill of fragrant vodka.

 

Finish:

Long smooth finish, with a lingering after taste and

Pigs Nose 18yo

40% abv

Islay (Peaty)

Aged in wooden casks

 

Nose: Spicy and malty, more so than the regular blend.

Palate: Full bodied, smoky with sweet aromas and vanilla.

Finish: Mild and smooth.

Conclusion: A whisky for a person who wants something different but not too different.

 

Pigs Nose Pure Malty Flavours Review:

Nose:

I was in the of mood to drink a whisky tonight, and the first one that caught my eye was Pigs Nose. The label is colourful and vibrant, so I decided I had to try the bottle I would be curious to see what Pigs Nose is like. The whisky is from a company called William Grant and Sons, and I have never had one of their whiskies before. Pigs Nose is a blend that is designed to be more of a “week evening” drink rather than a “festive evening” drink.Sadly, I am disappointed in Pigs Nose. I can’t explain it either. I just don’t think that it is something that I would buy. After all, it is a blend as well, and I usually fling blends away. I feel as though the whisky tastes of nothing really, and that is a bit disheartening. It is not bad at all, but if I were going to drink a no nonsense whisky, I would just as well drink Johnnie Walker Blue Label. Pigs Nose is a whisky that isn’t that bad. It has a very standard flavour to it, and I suppose that if I were to drink a drop of it to take the edge off, I would be very content. However, I think that I’ll be heading back to Johnnie Walker Blue Label, and always have that on hand. Since I am very disappointed by Pigs Nose, I am not going to give it a rating.This was my first ever encounter with this blend.Having recently returned from a trip to Florida, I thought I would reflect my trip to the Bourbon capital of the world back home in this review. 

Written by Mark Adams

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