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Drink Review : Balvenie 12 Year Old DoubleWood

One of the classic after-dinner malts, BalvenieDoublewood’s extra complexity and richness are a result of a second maturation in fresh sherry casks. Great stuff.

Balvenie Double Wood Review:

so much that can be said about Balvenie that it is vanishingly difficult to find balance between the exposition and the final verdict. I can say that is a rather old Scotch. If there was one Scotch I cherished, this was it.

We drink these occasionally, occasionally, and not otherwise.

When we’d run out, the nearest place to which I’d walked was right in front of the Ashokan distillery, formerly Woodchoppers. I’d rather forgotten the name of that distillery, and didn’t look it up at the time. I assume Balvenie did that to fool us, which defeats the purpose, really, because the pleasure of the whiskey will generally remain a secret.

That said, this 12-year-old straight doublewood whisky is a delight, and I congratulate Balvenie for offering such a fine product at a price that is not ridiculous.

If you have the chance, track it down. I tried to give you a chance, but you didn’t take it.

I’ve always liked a fine malt whisky and I welcome the arrival of the 12-year-old in particular. It’s a beauty, and though I generally dismiss its flavor it is not without distinction.

Although the 12-year-old’s flavor is not as complex as the 15, which I also like, it is no less attractive. My first wish for the 12-year-old would have been to see a little more raisin in its flavor but I think that’s just one more disclaimer for the 15-year-old as it is a slightly different beast.

The 15-year-old seems to be a really hard act to follow.

My nose for scotches is driven by the nose of the whisky, which is a good thing. And these do smell nice.

Balvenie uses mature Sherry casks to make their Doublewood 12 year old single malt. Although I’m generally not a big fan of the bourbon-aged double malts that are vodka strength, this one has some very interesting flavors.

Scotch flavored syrups are also available and can be tasted on the nose. One of my favorite flavors is Blackberry, which is a delicious mix of fruit and blackberry, and it can be tasted on the nose.

For the Balvenie 12 year old the flavor goes all the way to the finish, and it can be tasted there if you pay attention. The finish is more of a sweet flavor that tastes like of almonds, and it is delicious, and can be tasted if you pay attention.

Let us know what you think of the Balvenie 12 Year Old DoubleWood.

Balvenie Double Wood Review:

Written by: BenjamínCorcolón

Grade: 92

Pros: Great price, good taste

Cons: Cork filler, not flavorsome

Details: BalvenieDoubleWood draws its flavor from some of the finest vintage wood. Distilled in Scotland and aged in bourbon and sherry casks, it draws out the flavors of vanilla, mineral and spices to create a distinctive finish. Balvenie Double Wood Review:In aging BalvenieDoublewood double wood whiskeys, the distillery takes care to use casks that have been previously used in the production of other fine whiskies to prevent contamination. This means that every cask is unique and, as the Balvenie bottlings are matured in the same warehouses, the flavors are consistent.Let us know what you think of the Balvenie 12 Year Old DoubleWood.Written by: BenjamínCorcolónGrade: 92Pros: Great price, good tasteCons: Cork filler, not flavorsomeDetails: BalvenieDoubleWood draws its flavor from some of the finest vintage wood. Distilled in Scotland and aged in bourbon and sherry casks, it draws out the flavors of vanilla, mineral and spices to create a distinctive finish.

The notes of cedar and other spices are present, and they are most noticeable after you’ve been drinking them for a while.

The 12-year-old is too complex flavor-wise for my taste. It also does not have the strength to be considered a daily drink in my book.

Favorite bottles are almost at the end of their shelf life and, even if they weren’t, I couldn’t afford to drink them very often.

BalvenieDoublewood Review:

The flavor is similar to the 15-year-old but it is a little smoother and refined. The 11-year-old might be a better choice than the 12-year-old if you can find it, because it is not as strong as it’s older, younger brother.

The 12-year-old is not as “peppery” as the 15-year-old by the way.

Written by Mark Adams

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