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Drink Review: Jameson The Cooper’s Croze

The Cooper’s Croze is part of Jamesons’ The Whisky Maker series and has been selected by head cooper Ger Buckley to highlight the role wood plays in whiskey maturation. Using a combination of virgin oak, bourbon barrels and sherry casks, this has notes of vanilla, rich fruit and spice.

Jameson The Cooper’s Croze Review:

Nose:

Grappa soaked raisins, vanilla beans, toasted oats and hints of cherry and red fruits.

 

Taste:

Light liquorice and raisin fudge notes on the palate with a balance of youthful fruit, spice and brown sugar.

 

Finish:

Medium long. Spice, raisin toast, cherry cordial and cinnamon toast.

 

The Cooper’s Croze earns its title as a delicious whiskey. It may not blow you away on the first sip; but give it time and it’s worth. If you come across a bottle you should grab it.

 

Jameson The Cooper’s Croze Review:

Nose:

Grappa soaked raisins, vanilla beans, toasted oats and hints of cherry and red fruits.

 

Taste:

Light liquorice and raisin fudge notes on the palate with a balance of youthful fruit, spice and brown sugar.

 

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

Finish:

Medium long. Spice, raisin toast, cherry cordial and cinnamon toast.

 

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

The Cooper’s Croze is part of Jamesons’ The Whisky Maker series and has been selected by head cooper Ger Buckley to highlight the role wood plays in whiskey maturation. Using a combination of virgin oak, bourbon barrels and sherry casks, this has notes of vanilla, rich fruit and spice.You can buy Jameson Cooper’s Croze from the TWE Whisky Shop.

The Irish whiskey category has taken something of a hit in recent times. The main culprit for our apparent aversion is, of course, the overuse of the diabolically distasteful chill filtering method. While gaining the required clarity is fine, chill filtering purports to remove many of the so-called ”off flavours” such as oils and fatty acids. The unfortunate side effect of this is to also strip out many of the essential oils that add dimensions to the taste and aroma of whiskey. So instead of getting a whiskey of character we end up with a bland, monotonous mess. So in recent years we have lost many an Irish whiskey to the chill filtering vomit. Many of my favourites have become nothing more than flavourless water with a hint of Irish Whiskey. So it’s a pleasure to review a whiskey which is not subjected to this procedure. On this occasion, a whiskey which is well respected, the very fine Jameson. Jameson is a definite name in Irish whiskey circles and one of the few to buck the trend is this, the Cooper’s Croze.

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

Smell:

Grappa soaked raisins, vanilla beans, toasted oats and hints of cherry and red fruits.



Clearly we have a hint of vanilla as well the distinctive aroma of the grain used to make the whiskey. Overall, there are few whiskeys which have a better nose than this. And this is right up there with the very best Irish whiskey noses out there. The nose has amazing depth.

 

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

Taste:

Light liquorice and raisin fudge notes on the palate with a balance of youthful fruit, spice and brown sugar.

 

The palate is a perfect example of whiskey tasting notes done right. The nose carries over to the tasting notes, with the addition of spice and sweetness from the youth of the whiskey. Unlike the nose, the palate is a lot more mature. So it’s a perfect balance between the youth and the maturation.

 

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

Finish:

Medium long. Spice, raisin toast, cherry cordial and cinnamon toast.



The finish coats the mouth with its soothing after effect. The finish sticks with the initial flavours, with the addition of the elements of the sherry casks and the light spice coming through for the finish.

 

Jameson Cooper’s Croze Review:

I love this whiskey!

I love the nose, I love the taste and I love the finish. But as I take a moment to reflect upon the Cooper’s Croze, it’s one of the most sophisticated and mature whiskeys I have tasted. This whiskey is a complete package and it’s a package which is not subjected to chill filtration.



It’s funny, because I’m a fan of Jameson’s Midleton, but the Cooper’s Croze blows that right out of the water. I can’t see how anybody can prefer the Midleton once they have tried a well-aged whiskey such as the Cooper’s Croze. I like the Midleton, respect it for what it is and there are some great (dias)tillations of it, but the Cooper’s Croze is in a league of its own.

Written by Mark Adams

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