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Drink Review: Glenmorangie The Tayne

In 1583 a Spanish Armada was rounding Scotland as it fled from the English Navy. Legend has it that one of the boats in the fleet was sunk in the Tayne Firth near the distillery (now The Dornoch Firth) and that many of its survivors settled in Scotland. This whisky pays homage to those men and their stricken vessel, by putting a Spanish twist on Glenmorangie’s classic character.

Finished in, unusually, amontillado sherry casks, Tayne is a fragant whisky with notes including rose petals, roast chestnuts, sweet toffee, Muscovado sugar and tropical fruits.

Glenmorangie Tayne Review:

A Glenmorangie tasting note.

Sulphur comes immediately to mind with Tayne – as does honey. Then at first sip there are tropical fruits, nuts, caramel, toffee and syrup. A lot of fruit but almost to the point where you think this is childish and playfully sweet.

Then a southside Highland clear Highland water tingles the tongue. And what a tingle it is – it’s so vibrant and strong and it’s different to what we have ever tasted before. This is a unique and thrilling taste.

After the clear Highland water comes a distinct saltiness. And a wave of smoke drifts across the palate – like a salty, smoky breeze, maybe from a chimney. The smoke slowly fades and leaves just a light, mild malty aftertaste. A subtle burning feeling lingers in the mouth now.

Still that tingle lingers in the mouth and then (I’m not being sexist), one of the most beautiful chocolates we’ve ever tasted makes an appearance. Oh, ok, sorry, we asked the lady making the tasting notes, sorry! Chocolates is probably easier to describe.

Tayne has a very strange, an acquired taste. Definitely a sherry note and a lot of salt, fruit and salinity.

Tayne seems to change throughout the tasting and tries to grab the liquid. With a bit of time spent with this liquid you get into it, get to know it and its tastes, that’s where the fun comes in.

We put it through our ‘5 like factors’ test and it passed with flying colours. It has a great taste that starts with a fruity sweetness and a smokier finish.

Tayne is something you don’t get in a distillery everyday and we think you are going to love it as much as we enjoyed it here.

Glenmorangie Tayne Review:

Glenmorangie Tayne has a very strange, an acquired taste. Definitely a sherry note and a lot of salt, fruit and salinity.

The Glenmorangie tasting note was very precise as always – but something completely different was going on in the tasting – and that’s because of that electric taste of smoky, saltiness that grabbed us.

This is a remarkable whisky, it’s not one that you see every day.

A Glenmorangie tasting note.

Another problem is that this smoky-taste is very strong – it’s like the unseen occult that you hear about it.

There’s a surprising amount of saltiness for a Glenmorangie whisky, there’s even more than you would expect.

So yes, it is a very good tasting whisky, it’s very distinctive, but it’s not all about the taste you need to have the correct, the right attitude to appreciate it and that’s where Tayne differs from Glenmorangie’s classic character and character difference tests.

Tayne comes through with a lot of sea water and a tingle on the tongue, and a distinct and amazing flavour throws up a smoke. A very unusual flavour that stays with you in the taste – it persists and it’s a very unusual, unexpected and exciting flavour.

A rolling Highland clear Highland water runs through the palate. Then a salty, smoky flavour – that’s the closest thing we can describe it as. Like a sea breeze. And the smoke sticks to the tongue – it’s like tasting exhaust from a car.

Glenmorangie Tayne Review:

Finished in, unusually, amontillado sherry casks, Tayne is a fragant whisky with notes including rose petals, roast chestnuts, sweet toffee, Muscovado sugar and tropical fruits. It’s a smart move for a new edition of a classic which should bring new fans to Glenmorangie and should go down a treat in these very competitive times for single malt Scotch whisky.

Glenmorangie Tayne may look like a gimmicky new edition but it’s a real departure from the classic and a stunning addition to the single malt whisky world. Tayne is a strong, spicy, smoky, salty and fruity tasting whisky, which we would happily drink again.

Recommended.

Written by Mark Adams

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